5,600 520 554 0.477 42.7 158 184 60.8 5.9 82
5,700 507 551 0.483 43.2 158 185 60.7 5.9 82
5,800 497.4 549 0.482 42.8 158 185 60.6 5.9 82
5,900 486.7 547 0.475 42.1 159 185 60.5 5.9 82
6,000 477.4 545 0.475 41.9 160 185 60.4 5.8 82
6,100 466.4 542 0.476 41.9 160 185 60.2 5.9 82
6,200 456.5 539 0.48 42 160 185 60 5.9 82
6,300 445.9 535 0.485 42.2 160 185 59.7 5.8 82
6,400 434.3 529 0.484 41.8 160 185 59.5 5.9 82
6,500 423.8 525 0.487 41.6 160 185 59.5 5.9 82
Average Data            
5,250 522 516 0.435 36.1 157.9 183.9 60.4 5.89 82
Inertia Factor 1.32     Time 6.8 Secs

Two back-to-back pulls were made with the Edelbrcok heads, and, as this dyno sheet shows, horsepower was up to 556-an increase of 13 hp over the best the steel heads could do. Even more interesting was the fact that the horsepower didn't drop off as suddenly as it had with the steel heads. Also noteworthy was the fact that while peak torque only increased by 4 lb-ft, the torque curve was substantially broader than with the steel heads and at a higher rpm. This means more usable power at the track and more consistency with shift points being less critical. Backing up our dyno numbers was the fact that the pull time was reduced by one-tenth of a second, which means the engine accelerated quicker, a function of the additional torque and horsepower.