When we decide to build a car, much like you guys, a lot of money needs to be saved, parts need to be bought, and a lot of time has to be invested. Let's face it: We don't have 35 guys in a shop able to build a car in seven days. To that end, you guys have watched the build of the Dart Sport in stages. First, in the July 2006 issue, we chronicled finding the car, and actually making it a decent driver for under $900. Sure, it drove and was good enough for a cruise night, but lacked a little something. That little something was an attitude.

That brings us to September 2006, when we rebuilt the suspension, added new carpet to the interior, and appearance items like the wing, hoodscoop, and new tires-wow, looking back, it's been more than three years since we started this car. After that "stage" of the rebuild, the car may have looked like a muscle car, but lacked the aforementioned muscle. See what I mean, it all gets done in stages. Anyway, it was in the May 2007 issue when we finally swapped the tired six-cylinder for a used but good 360/four-speed combination we had lying around.

Anyway, while driving the car was fun, stopping and such was not so much. So, in the November 2007 issue, we upgraded to disc brakes-with the bigger bolt pattern pieces, and an 81/4 rear-all used and rebuilt swap meet and junkyard parts. And that was it; we had a cool V-8 driver that was fun to drive and was more than respectable.

But now it's time for one more stage of the project-paint and bodywork. This is the most frequently "farmed-out" job that no one holds any ill regards towards anybody for not doing it yourself. It takes a lot of patience, skill, and equipment to do it correctly. Lucky for us, we have a family member with just such patience, skill, and required equipment at his home garage to help us handle such a task.

Many of you know that the Sport was left in Pennsylvania after the 2008 All-Chrysler show in Carlisle, so the bodywork could be handled. After recuperating from the show, the disassembly began. It was discovered that there was more work than anticipated-which is to be expected when bodywork is begun, but nothing that was insurmountable.

So, we're off! With the help of the Paddock, Stephens Performance, and others, the final "stage" of the rebuild is under way.